Category Archives: videos

Educational tool for first responders

Now, that we are able to successfully simulate the collapse of big building structures, the software Blender gives its splendid support to exploit the simulation results for interactive walk throughs. BlenderĀ“s powerful features facilitate educational tools for rescue workers and paramedics. A training program could teach them in localizing victims within the debris, estimating their physical condition and applying first aid measures.

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Collapse simulation of the PGC building in Christchurch, 2011

We have reached an impressive milestone. Our BCB add-on has evolved into a serious simulation tool: One of the software validation cases in our Inachus research has been the collapsed Pyne Gould Corporation building in Christchurch. The building was destroyed in a devastating earthquake, on 22 February 2011. The Blender add-on was able to simulate the debris pattern fairly accurately as it can be seen from the video and the still images at the end of it.

Only the simulation of concrete structures is possible at the moment. Much remains to be done, such as the simulation of deformable building elements like steel structures. The bases is laid with the introduction of spring constraints. But the working of springs in Blender needs yet thorough investigation.

3D Interactive Walkthrough

This video is a first test to see if our simulation results can be used in an interactive walk through environment. The collapsed blender model is exported into the unreal game engine. Here a character can walk around, climb the debris or search inside for cavity spaces. This technology would be perfectly suitable for the education of rescue personnel. It is for example possible to apply physical behavior to debris fragments so that trainees can move pieces and experience the subsequent collapse.

Presentation at the Blender conference 2015

First we thought we would attend the Blender conference only as audience, but then got invited at short notice to present our research on our simulation tool to the community . The conference was streamed live over the internet, twitter messages were cast on the theater walls in minute cycles. We admit this was all quite exciting for us. The feedback and the interest after the talk was very encouraging. Now our talk is stored on youtube.